(Files by Brendan Pawliw-MyPGNow)

The CleanBC Roadmap to 2030 plan was unveiled by the BC Government to combat climate change.

The roadmap includes many actions, which include:

  • a commitment to increase the price on carbon pollution to meet or exceed the federal benchmark, with supports for people and businesses;
  • requirements for new industry projects to have enforceable plans to reach B.C.’s legislated and sectoral targets and net zero by 2050;
  • stronger regulations that will nearly eliminate industrial methane emissions by 2035;
  • a review of the oil and gas royalty system to ensure it aligns with B.C.’s climate goals and provides a return for British Columbians, with outcomes released in February 2022;
  • new requirements to make all new buildings zero-carbon by 2030;
  • an adoption of zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) by 2030 and 100% ZEVs by 2035;
  • developing new ZEV targets for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles;
  • a shift toward active transportation and public transit (30% by 2030; 40% by 2040; 50% by 2050);
  • increased clean fuel and energy efficiency requirements; and
  • support for innovation in areas like clean hydrogen, the forest-based bio-economy, and negative emissions technology.

“The scale of the climate emergency demands that we act with even greater urgency than ever before. By bringing people and businesses together, we can rise to the challenge and seize the opportunity to build a stronger, more resilient B.C. for everyone. That’s what this plan is all about,” said Premier John Horgan.

Horgan said the impacts of climate change are easily seen, adding that the threats of wildfires, heatwaves, and droughts are right in front of us.

“The CleanBC Roadmap puts greater focus on transitioning away from fossil fuels faster and adopting clean energy solutions. It strengthens B.C.’s position to attract investment and build opportunity for British Columbians and embodies our determination and commitment to meet our climate targets,” said Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy George Heyman.