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HomeNewsCow Moose Sign founder urges collaborative approach to address declining populations

Cow Moose Sign founder urges collaborative approach to address declining populations

The animals should be thriving, not declining, says the founder of the Cow Moose Sign Project.

“Lately it seems the moose are in the background because the caribou are very important species here too and I understand that,” Dan Simmons says. “It’s very unfortunate it’s happening to any of the species right now. I don’t get it. It shouldn’t be happening. The blame seems to be put on different people but you know we gotta figure this out. This is 2020 and we have to work together to figure this out sooner than later.”

With almost 900 signs having been distributed across the country and even the U.S. since the not for profit Cow Moose Sign Project launched over five years ago, Simmons says his main goal is for B.C. to establish an immediate moratorium on antlerless moose hunting.

“There are so much more people aware of the program, the project, and Chief Roy Stump taking the initiative to sign the MoU with the Conservation Officer Service (COS) was a huge step in the right direction that opened up a lot of eyes and I’m really proud of them for doing that, and we’re still trying to get more of that done with the Conservation Officer Service,” he says.

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Simmons is currently meeting and working with the Williams Lake Indian Band and COS with the ultimate goal of seeing such an MoU signed.

“The Cow Moose Sign Project has now over 30 First Nation Communities supporting and on board with the project. Last year in 2019 was a great year,” he says. “There was 57 four by eight signs purchased by First Nation Communities; nine First Nations in the Thompson Nicola Cariboo Region bought 30 signs and another 20 went to the Omineca region and the Skeena region with the Carrier Sekani First Nation who put them all up on forest service roads. We had another couple signs bought; one from Pioneer Logging that went up by the Complex and another very nice donation from PBR enterprises. Fort St. John and Prince George also bought some signs and we got one donated to the McLeod Lake First Nations.”

Simmons adds after receiving approval by local first nations, they are currently in the process of working on a billboard to be located by Cache Creek.

He reminds the public to respect and watch over the cow moose that are likely about 3 months pregnant this time of year.

“I’m always available. If somebody wants a sign we’ll get it figured out and we’re here to help anybody,” Simmons says. “I hope that it just keeps growing and growing with no end in sight.”

(Listen to the author of this report with Dan Simmons in the audio file below)

 

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